Hair stylist hopes to give MSU students ‘serenity’ by offering free services

Following the recent mass shooting on Michigan State University’s campus, Jordynn Greeson, a hair stylist at Capellini Salon in Okemos, stepped in to comfort students the best way she knows how – by doing hair. 

Greeson, who has been a licensed hair stylist for eight years, is from the Detroit area. She and her family moved to Okemos this November and she has been working at Capellini salon since January. 

Since Monday, Feb. 13, Greeson has been providing a variety of free hair treatments to MSU students. This includes haircuts, blowouts, conditioning treatments and silk presses. 

“I really wanted to make sure that everybody felt included,” Greeson said. “I didn’t want to limit the services that I was providing to one single person.” 

Going to the salon and getting her hair done is something that Greeson finds relaxing, so she wanted to provide a similar sense of peace to students impacted by Monday’s tragic events. 

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Jordynn Greeson blow dries vet student Sonia Rafique’s hair on Friday, Feb. 17. Rafique got her hair done for the Michigan State University College of Veterinary Medicine’s white coat ceremony, which took place Friday night.

After their services are completed, Greeson leaves students with a bag that includes self care items, her personal phone number and the number for a therapist who is offering free tele-health appointments to anyone impacted by the shooting. 

The therapist, who is Greeson’s personal therapist, is who first inspired her to offer these treatments. 

When Greeson showed up to her therapy appointment, they worked through ways to help her cope with the tragedy. The shooting hit close to home, as her cousin is a junior at MSU and her son attends preschool across the street from campus. 

After talking, Greeson and her therapist came to the conclusion that she is

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Smart Necklace Biosensor Monitors Glucose Levels Through Sweat

A device that might one day utilize the chemical indicators in sweat to identify changes in a person’s health has successfully undergone testing by researchers.

Smart Necklace Biosensor Monitors Glucose Levels Through Sweat.
Participants rode on stationary bikes to produce enough sweat for the study’s sensor to analyze. Image Credit: Getty Images

A team from The Ohio State University recently presented a wireless, battery-free biochemical sensor that could detect the blood sugar, or glucose, that individuals release from their skin when they exercise. The work was published in the journal Science Advances.

The Ohio State researchers created a “smart necklace” that included a working clasp and pendant and was worn around the participants’ necks to track their blood glucose levels as they exercised.

It operates without a battery by reflecting radio frequency signals from an external reader system using a resonance circuit. Participants cycled for a minimum of 30 minutes, had a 15-minute rest, and then resumed cycling after consuming sugar-sweetened drinks.

According to Jinghua Li, co-author of the work and assistant professor of materials science and engineering at Ohio State, the challenge was whether this novel sensor would detect the rise in sweat glucose levels that should occur after consuming a sweetened beverage.

The sensor did effectively track the glucose levels, according to the data, which implies that it will also be able to detect other significant compounds in sweat.

Sweat actually contains hundreds of biomarkers that can reveal very important information about our health status. The next generation of biosensors will be so highly bio-intuitive and non-invasive that we will be able to detect key information contained in a person’s body fluids.

Jinghua Li, Study Co-Author and Assistant Professor, Material Science and Engineering, Ohio State University

Biomarkers are materials that can reveal a body’s most intimate information:

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Smart Necklace Can Track Blood Sugar Through Sweat

Jewelry of the future may be used not only as a fashion accessory, but also to monitor aspects of a person’s health, thanks to new research from The Ohio State University. Researchers there have developed a device that can be worn around the neck to monitor a person’s glucose levels from sweat excreted when he or she exercises, they said. It could one day be used as a way to help people with diabetes to keep track of their blood sugar without painful pin pricks, they said. The so-called “smart necklace” includes a typical clasp and pendant, but also features a battery-free, wireless biochemical sensor that researchers used to measure test subjects’ blood sugar through their perspiration, they said.

“Sweat actually contains hundreds of biomarkers that can reveal very important information about our health status,” Jinghua Li, assistant professor of materials science and engineering at Ohio State, stated in an article in Ohio State News. “The next generation of biosensors will be so highly bio-intuitive and non-invasive that we’ll be able to detect key information contained in a person’s body fluids.”

Indeed, scientists are finding human perspiration a useful natural component for novel wearable-device design. A research team from Penn State University already has used sweat to measure glucose with the development of a non-invasive patch-like sensor made with a nickel-gold alloy.

Meanwhile, engineers at the University of California (UC) San Diego developed a wearable microgrid that harvests energy from various renewable sources—including perspiration—to power small electronic devices.

Smart Necklace Design

While the smart necklace designed by the Ohio State team doesn’t use sweat to power the device, it does work without a battery by using a resonance circuit, which reflects radio frequency signals sent out by an external reader system for power, researchers said. The sensor is made

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