KONDA: Impulse buying contributes to US’ materialistic culture

Sometimes, people buy things on impulse. It does not sound too bad now and then – buying a cheap trinket while you are out grocery shopping. No, you do not need it, but there is no actual harm done to your bank account, and you feel satisfied with your new addition.

Corporations are fully aware of these behaviors and take advantage of consumer tendencies by employing marketing tactics such as product placement. While carefully considering how people might react to specific products that are displayed in certain ways, businesses have already determined the probability of your purchase. For instance, buying a candy bar while checking out is more common when it’s easily accessible in the moment. 

The problem is continuous impulsive buying — coming home with at least one thing you do not need or clicking the ‘order’ button on an online shopping site. A survey by Slickdeals found that 64 percent of adults in the U.S. increasingly bought on impulse, and 61 percent felt happy afterward. 

Buying something random could positively affect your mood — and it makes sense. But, you could find yourself depending on doing so to help you get through the day. The more you buy, the better you feel. You might end up spending more money each time, going from $10 to $20.

In fact, Americans increased their spending by 18 percent from January through April 2020. Slickdeals’ CEO Josh Meyers says impulse buying can be smart as people take advantage of bulk deals. On the other hand, it could be detrimental.

The truth is that products expire. Whether it’s denoted in a label on the packaging or expires in terms of its social popularity, people end up with things they do not need, and this contributes to consumerism.

Consumerism is described as materialistic

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